All about each symptom of menopause
women going through menopause

An Exercise Routine to Lose Weight

Losing weight can be difficult, especially for women going through menopause. You may notice your appetite is greater than usual, or that you have put on weight without changing your eating habits at all. Even if your diet hasn't changed, your body may retain more fat, which can make you gain weight quickly. When it comes to developing an exercise routine, it's important not to set impossible goals. This article will show you that when you make a realistic plan you actually enjoy - rather than one you dread - you not only lose weight, you also have fun along the way.

An Exercise Routine to Lose Weight

Add Movement

The easiest way to add movement to your life is by sitting less. Try walking or biking instead of driving whenever possible. Take advantage of the little things, like taking the stairs instead of elevator, walking the dog, and doing yard- and housework. Having more sex is also a fantastic way to burn calories, and you can count that as part of your weekly cardio amount.

Increase Cardio

After getting your blood pumping through active daily activities, you will be more ready to begin increasing your cardiovascular exercise. Cardio can be a jog in the park or a session on the treadmill, elliptical machine, or stair climber, among other things. Add at least 75 minutes of vigorous cardio to your week in addition to the standard 2.5 hours to notice improvement in your weight. These activities should increase your heart rate, so it is important you breathe deeply and stay hydrated during your exercise sessions.

Weight Training

Weight training can be done with free weights, machines, resistance bands, or calisthenics, such as push-ups, pull-ups, and crunches. If you use free weights or machines, make sure you receive guidance from a trainer who can tell you how to properly use them, as misuse can cause serious injury.

With weight training, make sure to start off light and increase the weight gradually as you get stronger. This will help you tone and sculpt your body. Always allow one day of rest in between these exercises so that your muscles can repair themselves properly.

Take Classes

As your fitness improves, you may want to switch it up with some classes. This is a fun way to stay engaged when you become bored with your routine. You should add variety as much as possible and try any class that you think sounds interesting.

Don't worry, all levels of fitness and experience are usually more than welcome in group exercise classes. Zumba, spin, kickboxing, Pilates, and yoga are all great to keep up your regimen and even make new friends.

Whether you have been exercising for a while or this is a new endeavor for you, a solid routine can always help you lose weight and stay healthy. By easing your way into a regular fitness plan, you can feel the benefits of exercise in your life. For more information about weight gain during menopause and how to treat it, follow the links below.

How to Win Against Food Cravings

Food cravings can be a serious problem when approaching menopause. Read on to learn some ways to handle them.

Weight Gain and Metabolism

Many women feel as if their metabolism changes as they go through menopause. Keep reading to learn more about dieting and metabolism during menopause.

10 Weight Loss Myths That Won't Help You during Menopause

You've noticed a little weight gain here and there and you've set out to shed the postmenopause pounds. Read on for advice and information.

Sources:
  • Harvard Medical School. (2011). Benefits of exercise: reduces stress, anxiety, and helps fight depression. Retrieved February 18, 2016, from http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/benefits-of-exercisereduces-stress-anxiety-and-helps-fight-depression
  • National Institutes of Health. (2015). Exercise and Physical Fitness. Retrieved February 18, 2016, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/exerciseandphysicalfitness.html
  • Office on Women's Health. (2009). Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet. Retrieved February 18, 2016, from http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/physical-activity.html