All about each symptom of menopause
women going through menopause

Sudden Mood Changes: Why My Mood Changes Rapidly

Mood changes occur for all women. Nevertheless, there may be instances throughout their reproductive lives in which they consistently experience sudden mood changes that occur without an obvious cause. Continue reading to learn more about sudden mood changes and why they happen as one of the first steps to get back on track to having a stable disposition. 

Why does my mood change so quickly

Normal versus Rapid Mood Changes

It is important to make the distinction between normal mood changes and rapid mood swings before continuing.

In general, normal mood changes occur due to external factors. It could be that one minute you are feeling happy, and the next, you're furious. However, once sufficient enough time passes after the incident, you return to contentedness. The mood swing occurred due to something outside of your power. Some possible external factors that could trigger a mood change are rush hour; communication problems with friends, family, or coworkers; prolonged stress; and loss of a loved one, among others.

On the other hand, sudden mood swings are due to internal imbalance. Because of an underlying health condition, you are more on edge even though you have no reason to be. These rapid mood changes are normally uncontrollable and severe enough to cause disruption in everyday routines and relationships.

Why Does My Mood Change So Quickly?

Rapid mood swings are a symptom of various health issues.

Hormonal Causes

Sudden mood swings are caused by fluctuating hormone levels, especially estrogen, making women more susceptible to depression, irritability, anxiety, and other states of emotion. Various research studies have found that estrogen has an impact on the production of the “feel-good” neurotransmitter serotonin, which has mood-enhancing qualities. However, the exact implications of the relationship between the two require further investigation. 

As such, hormonal imbalance can induce rapid mood changes without any external stimulation. Also, abnormalities in hormone levels might make the person more susceptible to overreacting to external triggers that could cause mood swings.

More Causes

There are a variety of mood disorders that can also cause sudden changes in mood as well. These health conditions include hyperthyroidism, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, dysthymia (low-grade depression), and more.

When Should I Be Concerned?

For women of all ages, it is normal to go through short-term changes in mood depending on current circumstances in life. A woman may feel calm one moment then experience a sudden change of mood in which she feels angered beyond belief, only to return to emotional balance relatively soon after.

However, an underlying health condition may be to blame in cases of daily rapid mood swings or a consistent pattern of sudden mood swings. These instances should not be brushed off as typical and should be addressed right away with a doctor. 

Conclusion

Keep in mind the difference between normal and rapid mood changes, which are each product of variable causes and should each be approached differently.

In the case of hormonal imbalance, there are numerous options a woman can pursue to manage and treat sudden changes in mood. Consuming a diet rich in complex carbs that boost serotonin levels; reducing stress with yoga, massage, or aromatherapy; and implementing the use of alternative medicine are just a few choices available to treat mood swings. With proper management, you can get your life back on a steady path in no time.

Understanding Menopause: Mood Swings and Irritability

Mood swings and irritability can be managed in a variety of ways. Read on to learn more about what causess these menopause symptoms.

How Does Birth Control Affect My Mood Swings?

Women are more likely to become severely depressed if they are taking hormonal contraceptive. Read on to find out more.

Mood Swings and Eating Disorders

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental health condition, but eating disorders are often misunderstood or dismissed.

Sources:
  • Hazelden Publishing. (2016). Mood-related Disorders. Retrieved August 17, 2018, from http://www.bhevolution.org/public/mood_disorders.page
  • PsychEducation.org. (2014). Estrogen in Psychiatry. Retrieved August 16, 2018, from http://psycheducation.org/hormones-and-mood-introduction/basic-information-about-estrogen-in-psychiatry/
  • Rybaczyk, L.A. (2005). An overlooked connection: serotonergic mediation of estrogen-related physiology and pathology. BMC Women's Health, 5, 12. doi: 10.1186/1472-6874-5-12
  • Women in Balance Institute: National University of Natural Medicine. (n.d.). Anxiety, Irritability & Mood Swings. Retrieved August 16, 2018, from https://womeninbalance.org/symptoms-solutions/irritability-mood-swings/