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Relaxing Activities That Keep Mood Swings Away

Mood swings are one of the most common symptoms of menopause. Fluctuating hormone levels can result in varied emotions throughout the day, which can become exhausting. One moment you'll be fine, and the next moment sobbing hysterically. Feelings of anger and anxiety can make you feel unlike your usual self, which may disrupt your life or put strain on your relationships. It is more important than ever to keep your body and mind regulated through movement. There are many uplifting activities that can directly affect your brain chemistry and exude joy and balance. Maintain a healthy mindset safely and effectively.

Relaxing Activities That Keep Mood Swings Away
1

Yoga

This activity is known for its ability to ease anxiety. Beyond being a great physical workout, it has a strong emphasis on establishing peace of mind.  Through deep breathing, balancing, strengthening, and stretching, you let go of thoughts and improve focus. At the same time, the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is released by the brain, which brings on strong feelings of tranquility.

2

Hiking

Cardio is great because it energizes you and increases levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that makes you feel joyous. When you go for a hike through a nature trail, you can be extremely rejuvenated. The bright sun will provide you with mood-boosting vitamin D, and the colors and sounds of nature can relax your nervous system. This is a very positive activity for getting perspective on life and appreciating the pleasures of the earth.

3

Dancing

Go dancing with friends or family. The music, movement, and interaction may often make you feel expressed and connected with others. Dancing is one of the most enjoyable ways to improve cardiovascular health. When you do it with others, your brain releases oxytocin, which exudes feelings of friendship and loyalty. Your worries will likely stand no chance against your dance moves.

4

Cooking

Cooking can be an extremely serene activity. There is a reason why chefs are so passionate about it and become so involved. Food is your sustenance. When you become fully involved in the process of preparation, you can appreciate it more.
Lay out all of your ingredients. When you cut the vegetables, take in the colors and scents. When the ingredients sizzle on the pan, enjoy the sounds and changes in the food as it's cooked. When you serve it on the plates, do it with care and concentration, enjoying the aroma. Finally, upon eating your creation, you can take in the flavors and feel it nourish your body.

Sometimes the simplest activities can be the most relaxing. Do not underestimate the benefits of moving to a song or creating a delicious dinner. If you make sure to incorporate these four activities into each week, it can help improve your mood. Each can soothe anxiety and help you focus on more positive aspects of life. With movement comes appreciation and emotional well-being.

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Sources:
  • Goldman, B. (2013). "Love Hormone" May Play Wider Role In Social Interaction Than Previously Thought, Scientists Say. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2013/september/oxytocin.html
  • NYU Langone Medical Center. (2013). GABA. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=222543
  • Office of Dietary Supplements. (2011). Vitamin D. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/
  • Office on Women's Health. (2013). physical activity (exercise) fact sheet. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/physical-activity.html
  • Young, S.N. (2007). How to increase serotonin in the human brain without drugs. Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, 32(6), 394-399. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2077351/