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How to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work

Struggling to remember where you left your keys, purse or cell phone? Did you forget to pick up the groceries despite reminding yourself several times? You may be suffering from menopausal memory lapses. It's often said that when you reach a certain age your memory begins to fade. But how can you deal with these changes?

How to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work1

Dealing with forgetful moments when you are by yourself or with friends and family may be perfectly manageable, but managing them at work may be another story. Your job is important to you, and perhaps you've worked many years to reach your current position. Memory lapses at work can make you question yourself, and they can be embarrassing. How can you deal with these episodes when they happen?

Steps to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work

1

Understand the problem

How to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work2

The first step in solving the problem is to understand what memory lapses are, and why they happen. Simply put, a memory lapse is the failure to remember a piece of information. This information can be anything from how to complete a task to a phone number or a scheduled event. Memory lapses are a symptom of menopause and a result of fluctuating hormone levels during this time. They can last a few seconds or a few minutes, but are frustrating and inconvenient for those who experience them. Fortunately, there are things you can do to manage these situations.

2

Form connections

How to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work3

If you are experiencing frequent memory lapses, one of the first things you can try is forming connections to remember people's names and other pieces of important information. If you commonly forget people's names, repeating them to yourself or associating them with a word or idea can ensure that you don't lose them later.

3

Make notes

How to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work4

When at work, it is important that you are alert, informed, and have all the information you need. During menopause, or even just on the occasional off day, it is worth making notes of every important piece of information you come across. This way you will be prepared for any questions, as information will be written down for you to retrieve quickly.

4

Reduce stress

How to Deal with Memory Lapses at Work5

Although memory lapses are a common symptom of menopause, there are many other triggers that can lead to this problem. Stress causes a multitude of side effects. By taking regular breaks at work, walking around, and focusing your attention on something else momentarily, you can reduce stress levels

5

Stay hydrated

Water is the most important liquid in the body. It is essential to regulating body temperature and maintaining normal body functions. Ensure that you always have glass of water ready at your desk, and try to drink six to eight glasses each day.

More Information

Memory loss isn't unusual during menopause. It is a common symptom that women often attribute to age. Moments of forgetfulness are a result of hormonal imbalance, so beyond the above tips, you may improve them by adjusting your lifestyle and supplementing your diet with natural herbs.

Click the following links for more information about treatments for memory lapses.

How to Handle Your Mother's Menopausal Memory Lapses

Memory lapses are one of many symptoms your mother may be experiencing during menopause, and she will need all your support.

Menopause and Memory: 5 Tips to Remember Before You Forget

During menopause you may experience simple memory lapses, such as forgetting car keys or telephone numbers.

5 Mental Exercises to Improve Concentration Levels

Menopause can affect your memory and concentration and render people prone to distraction and with lessened productivity.

Sources:
  • Dr. Devi, Gayatri. "Memory Loss, Estrogen, Menopause & Alzheimer's Disease". The New York Memory Services. www.nymemory.org.
  • Dr. Devi, Gayatri; Hahn, Katherine; Massimi Stephen; Zhivotovskaya, Emiliya. Prevalence of memory loss complaints and other symptoms associated with the menopause transition. Gender Medicine, 2005, vol. 2.
  • Myers, Catherine E. "Categories of Memory Systems". Memory Loss & the Brain. www.memorylossonline.com.
  • News-Medical.Net.(n.d)."Memory loss and menopause". Retrieved from www.news-medical.net.