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Dealing with a Woman's Low Libido

Loss of libido is very common among menopausal women. If you are a woman going through menopause, or know one who is, you may be familiar with some of the side effects of this frustrating symptom. Typically, women will experience decreased sex drive, sensitivity, and lubrication. Even if she has always had a healthy sex life, the many menopausal changes taking place can make it hard to maintain a sexual appetite. With understanding of the condition and the best, healthiest, and most effective remedies, however, it can be much easier to regain passion.

Dealing with a Woman's Low Libido

Understanding the Cause

Low libido is a direct cause of hormonal changes during menopause. Sex hormones, such as estrogen and testosterone, plummet and fluctuate rapidly, which results in many of the uncomfortable side effects associated with loss of libido. A woman may notice that sex is not on her mind as often, which can be due to low testosterone. She will also experience decreased blood flow to her sex organs as a result of reduced estrogen, which can cause a restricted ability to become lubricated and aroused.

Finding Relaxation

Stress becomes more prevalent when a woman is going through menopause. The decrease in sex hormones actually can increase cortisol levels and decrease endorphin levels. This causes more anxiety and less serenity. When you are distracted by worry, it is even harder for you to respond to sexual cues.

Daily meditation or yoga are both great ways to become present and gain flexibility of your body and mind. Some women are surprised by how much of their low libido was emotional, and upon letting go of strain, experience improved sexuality.

Incorporating Physical Activity

Another important way to boost your sex drive is to get your blood flowing. The best way to do this is through physical activity. When you lead a sedentary lifestyle, your body will be less responsive in the heat of the moment. If you get 2.5 hours of cardio weekly, it will improve your circulation and thereafter your sexual experiences.

Another popular exercise for improved libido are Kegel exercises. These focus specifically on the pelvic region and work by contracting and releasing muscles in that area. Through this muscle strengthening, women's arousal and orgasms can become stronger.

Utilizing Herbal Supplements

One way to increase your libido is with medicinal plants. There are now suitable options for women to turn to in the pharmaceutical world, but there are also many herbal remedies that have been used for thousands of years. One popular herbal remedy is yohimbe. The active ingredient in this West African tree bark is yohimbine, which can improve circulation to the sex organs when taken in combination with the amino acid L-arginine. Likewise, Macafem is another herbal supplement that has been shown to restore hormonal balance and relieve loss of libido and other menopause symptoms.

Many women think that their loss of libido is inevitable and sex will never be the same again. Although it is true that unavoidable changes may take place, it does not at all indicate an end to sensuality, but rather a shift. The shift can actually make you more in tune with your body and have deeper and healthier sex than ever before. Embrace this sense of renewal with natural and exciting solutions.

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Sources:
  • National Institutes of Health. (2013). Physical activity. Retrieved April 22, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001941.htm
  • National Institutes of Health. (2014). Yohimbe. Retrieved April 22, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/759.html
  • Office on Women's Health. (2012). Menopause and menopause treatments. Retrieved April 22, 2014, from http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/menopause-treatment.html