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Best Things to Do or to Take for Hot Flashes

If you experience hot flashes, then it's likely that you are looking for a way to get these annoying moments to stop. Luckily, there are several things to help with hot flashes, and some of them are just minor lifestyle adjustments to make. Read on to learn some of the best things for hot flashes!

Best Things to Take for Hot Flashes

Best Things to Do for Hot Flashes

Avoid common triggers

One of the best ways to stop the frustrating appearance of hot flashes is to prevent them before they occur. Many women notice that after eating spicy foods, drinking coffee, drinking alcohol, smoking, or wearing tight clothing, they are more likely to experience hot flashes, so cutting down on - or perhaps eliminating entirely - all of these things is likely to help you reduce the likelihood of a hot flash.

Notice what specifically triggers your hot flashes

Not all women are bothered by common triggers, and some may have their own unique triggers that cause problems. Think about keeping a log of every time you experience a hot flash, even if it is just a note in your phone, to see what patterns may emerge.

Reduce stress

Sometimes, tension can make it more likely for a hot flash to begin - even long-term tension that is not causing you immediate anxiety. Finding ways to help yourself relax, such as meditation, yoga, or even moderate exercise, is likely to be one of the best things to help with hot flashes in the long run.

Dress in layers

If you can't prevent them entirely, the best thing for hot flashes is to be prepared. Dressing in layers can help you beat the problem caused by hot flashes by giving you an opportunity to remove layers as you need to in order to cool off.

Have a fan handy

A fan is another excellent tool to help you to cool down. Small handheld fans, both battery-operated and manual, are available for you to help yourself reduce your body temperature during a hot flash.

Best Things to Take for Hot Flashes

Black cohosh

One of the most effective herbs for menopause-related symptoms, black cohosh is thought to be among the best things to take for hot flashes. It is often sold in capsule form, but may also be taken as a tea, and studies have shown it to help reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes.

Soy products

Another helpful addition to your diet is soy. Because many soy products contain estrogen, they can help your body replace the estrogen it has lost and reduce the symptoms caused by low estrogen - such as hot flashes.

Hormone-regulating supplements

There are natural supplements available for menopausal women to stop hot flashes, they no contain synthetic estrogen,they nourish the endocrine system, which result in more natural hormones.This ultimately results in balancing not only estrogen,but also progesterone.

Knowing these useful tips will make it much easier for you to prevent and deal with the symptoms of hot flashes caused by menopause. Learn more about 4 popular medications for hot flashes to learn more about controlling the problem.

Tea Options for Hot Flashes

Tea may be a good idea if you suffer from hot flashes. Click here to learn more about managing hot flashes effectively.

Q&A: Alcohol and Hot Flashes

Hot flashes during menopause can be triggered by many things, one of which is alcohol. Click here to learn more.

Managing Thyroid Problems and Hot Flashes

Although hot flashes are most commonly associated with menopause, they can also be caused by some thyroid conditions. Click here to learn more.

Sources:
  • National Institutes of Health. (n.d).What Can You Do for Hot Flashes and Other Menopausal Symptoms. Retrieved June 9, 2017 from https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/menopause-time-change/what-can-you-do-hot-flashes-and-other-menopausal-symptoms
  • Mayo Clinic. (2017).Hot Flashes Overview. Retrieved June 9, 2017 from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hot-flashes/home/ovc-20319434
  • National Health Service UK. (2015). Hot flushes: how to cope. Retrieved June 9, 2017, from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/menopause/Pages/hot-flushes.aspx