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How to Deal with Fatigue at Work

Maybe you've been struggling to wake up in the morning for as long as you can remember, or you've battled afternoon fatigue for many years, but often during menopause, tiredness throughout the day can become an even bigger issue. Fatigue is a frustrating but common part of menopause. Energy dips can be difficult, especially at work, so it's important to have the tools you need to manage them.

Though it may feel like a losing battle sometimes, by adapting your work and home life, it is possible to manage your fatigue. Here are some suggestions on how to deal with fatigue at work.

5 Suggestions for Dealing with Fatigue at Work

1

Start your day right

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A good, restful night of sleep can help to ensure that you have as much energy as possible for the day ahead. Six to eight hours is the minimum for most people. When you follow that with a nutritious breakfast full of protein and healthy grains, you give yourself the best chance at controlling fatigue through the workday.

2

Arrange your desk

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A crowded workspace can make everything seem harder. When you're already stressed and low on energy, clutter makes things even more frustrating. Start by arranging your desk so that everything has a place and you are happy with its appearance. Keep a notepad on your desk to jot things down throughout the day and ensure that you don't forget anything important. This will make your workday smoother and easier.

3

Stay hydrated

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Water is essential to maintaining energy levels. The equivalent of six to eight glasses a day is the recommended amount to keep your body functioning properly. Keeping a glass at your desk is a good reminder to refill and rehydrate throughout your workday. A cool drink of water can give you a surprising boost when you're feeling sluggish.

4

Take breaks

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There's nothing more exhausting than staying completely focused on tasks all day without allowing time for breaks. Redirecting energy through short breaks is necessary and can involve things like walking around the office, going out for coffee, or just staring out the window for a couple of minutes. The important thing is to take your mind off work so that you can recharge.

5

Listen to music

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Music brightens the mood, and some studies have shown that music also increases productivity. This is a benefit to both employee and employer. Happiness breeds positive energy, productivity, and promotes an effective work environment. Music without lyrics is better for increasing attention and performance.

More Information about Fatigue at Work

There are many ways to battle menopausal fatigue. The above suggestions can make your workday run more smoothly, but don't forget life at home. When you get home after a long day, make sure to relax and do things for yourself that relieve stress and allow for restful sleep.

Click on the following link for more information about treatments for menopausal fatigue.

Low Impact Exercises to Help Combat Fatigue

If you suffer from fatigue, low impact exercises are the best way to naturally combat the disorder. This article provides examples.

Myths and Facts about Diets That Cause Fatigue

Diets that suggest cutting too many calories encourage fatigue and nutrient deficiency. Prevent this by eating healthy, balanced meals and snacks.

Menopause Fatigue

Several factors can contribute to fatigue during menopause. Lifestyle changes can improve sleep, energy, and help deal with menopause fatigue.

Sources:
  • Love, S. (2003). Menopause and Hormone Book. New York: Three Rivers Press.
  • National Health Service UK. (2014). Beat the workplace energy slump. Retrieved January 12, 2016, from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/workplacehealth/Pages/energyslumps.aspx
  • Shih, Y.N. , Huang, R.H. & Chiang, H.Y. (2012). Background music: effects on attention performance. Work, 42(4), 573-578. doi: 10.3233/WOR-2012-1410