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How Can I Help My Wife's Menopausal Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most frequently reported symptoms among menopausal women, affecting as many as 80% of women while they transition through menopause. Fatigue refers to the ongoing feeling of tiredness, weakness, or lack of energy, rather than the urge to sleep.

Fatigue during menopause is typically caused by hormone fluctuations, specifically of estrogen and progesterone. Fatigue can also be triggered by lifestyle factors like poor diet, insufficient sleep, and lack of exercise. Some common symptoms that accompany fatigue include difficulty concentrating, irritability, and headaches. Although you cannot get rid of your partner's fatigue, you can help them find a good solution and make day-to-day life more manageable for them by using the following tips.

Cooking a healthy meal with plenty of vegetables, lean protein, and complex carbohydrates will give her an energy boost.
1

Help Out Around the House

Clean up the kitchen and make sure to clean up any mess that you make. No one wants to come home to or wake up in a messy house, especially if they are feeling fatigued. Doing housework is usually not a top priority for someone feeling fatigued, so step-in and make sure household chores are not being neglected.

2

Listen

Really listen to her and her needs. It will go a long way, and it can help you understand what she is feeling and going through during this transition.

3

Offer Her a Massage

Stress is one of the leading causes of fatigue, so try to help relieve her stress by offering to lovingly massage her neck and shoulders, where tension can build up. Adding relaxing essential oil like peppermint will be a nice touch.

4

Prepare a Soothing Bath

Again, stress relief can significantly help fight fatigue, so draw up a nice warm bath with essential oils like lavender or rosemary. Light some candles and put on soothing music for her. She will appreciate the gesture, and may even invite you to join her.

5

Cook for Her

Cook up a healthy meal with plenty of vegetables, protein, and complex carbohydrates for her. These healthy foods will give her an energy boost and be good for the overall health of both of you.

6

Be with Her

Suggest taking a yoga class or going for a bike ride together. Exercise may not be what she wants to do when she is feeling tired, but it will help in the long run. Regular exercise has been shown to help boost energy levels, improve mood, and reduce stress. Plus, it is always easier to be motivated to work out when you have a buddy.

Fatigue impacts many people, and it can significantly interfere with their daily life and relationships. Fatigue often brings along other unpleasant symptoms, like irritability and headaches. It is important to try to understand what your partner is going through in order to properly help her recover. Helping out around the house, exercising together, and simply listening to her are all supportive ways to help your wife's menopausal fatigue.

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Sources:
  • National Health Service UK. (2013). Why am I tired all the time? Retrieved August 13, 2014, from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/tiredness-and-fatigue/Pages/why-am-I-tired.aspx
  • Office of Women's Health. (2010). Menopause. Retrieved August 13, 2014, from http://womenshealth.gov/menopause/symptom-relief-treatment/natural-alternative-treatments-lifestyle-changes.html
  • University of Maryland. (2011). Fatigue. Retrieved August 13, 2014, from http://www.umgcc.org/patient_info/62811causes-of-fatigue-in-cancer-patients.htm