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5 Alternative Treatments for Menopausal Electric Shocks

A zap between the muscles, a surging impulse beneath the skin - electric shock syndrome can seem to come on as abruptly as lightning, and the likelihood of its occurrence rises as women go through the various stages of menopause. Though not as common as some other menopausal symptoms, this condition is certainly treatable. Read on to learn about five methods you can use as treatments for electric shocks and find relief today in a natural way.

1

Nervous System Support

5 Alternative Treatments for Menopausal Electric Shocks

Making dietary changes is one easiest treatments for electric shock syndrome to apply. Though more scientific research is needed to fully understand the causes of this sensation, one possible explanation is the misfiring of neurons within the nervous system. To keep processes functioning normally, it's helpful to eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, and high in calcium, such as low-fat dairy products.

2

Estrogen-Rich Diet

5 Alternative Treatments for Menopausal Electric Shocks

For menopausal women, the most common cause for this condition is thought to be hormonal imbalance, since estrogen plays a vital, complex role within the nervous system. Therefore, another nutrition-based treatment for electric shocks involves raising levels of this hormone, which can be accomplished by eating phytoestrogenic foods, or foods that contain plant-based estrogens. Soy products, avocado, and sunflower seeds are just a few of the options available that could provide overall relief from menopause symptoms.

3

Stress Relief Techniques

5 Alternative Treatments for Menopausal Electric Shocks

Stress can trigger many menopausal symptoms, and the sensation of electric shocks is no exception. For this reason, treatments for electric shocks also include stress-reduction methods. Yoga and deep breathing are great for rebalancing sleep-wake cycles and getting enough oxygen to the brain. Additionally, aromatherapy and acupuncture can also be helpful for stimulating circulation and strengthening the system.

4

Regular Exercise

5 Alternative Treatments for Menopausal Electric Shocks

Though its onset is unpredictable, the electric shock sensation does manifest in some women as a precursor to hot flashes. It stands to reason, therefore, that a reduced risk of hot flashes will also reduce the risk of this prickling feeling. Regular aerobic exercise is proven to help cut down on hot flashes and other menopausal discomforts by allowing the body to function at optimum efficiency. This is one of the treatments for electric shocks that goes above and beyond.

5

Herbal Supplements

5 Alternative Treatments for Menopausal Electric Shocks

Lifestyle changes are the first important step toward regaining hormonal balance and, for most women, work well as treatments for electric shocks. When menopausal symptoms persist, however, the next step is to find a natural hormonal supplement, which works with the body to boost estrogen production at the source. Herbal supplements can reduce the side effects of this stage of life, and are certainly recommended before resorting to prescription drugs.

Because of its relative rarity when compared to other symptoms of menopause, electric shock syndrome is not as frequently discussed as it should be - but that doesn't mean women who experience it must suffer in silence. Try out one or more of the treatments for electric shocks above to find relief in no time.

How to Recognize the Electric Shock Sensation

Women during menopause are susceptible to electric shock sensation. Click on the following link to read more about treatments for electric shock.

Sources:
  • Heinrichs, S.C. (2010). Dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for optimizing neuronal structure and function. Molecular nutrition & food research, 54(4), 447-456. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.200900201.
  • MedlinePlus. (2013). New Clues About Hot Flashes and the Brain. Retrieved September 11, 2013 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_139218.html