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Menopause: Getting Into a Routine to Beat Depression

Getting Into a Routine to Beat Depression1

When a woman reaches the age of menopause, she may suffer from some uncomfortable symptoms. Some are physical and some are psychological, and nearly all are a result of hormone imbalance. At this age, a woman's body ceases to produce the amount of estrogen she has become accustomed to. As a result, many may find they suffer with mood swings, hot flashes, and depression.

Depression may be one of the most difficult symptoms for menopausal women and their loved ones to deal with. A woman may feel listless, useless, helpless, and bored and all for no apparent reason. The good news is that unless you are a sufferer of chronic depression, your menopausal blues are probably temporary and treatable with natural methods. For tips on how to beat menopausal depression the natural way, read the following information and consult your doctor.

A Routine for a Healthy Mind

For many women suffering from depression, a routine can be beneficial in helping to stay on course and avoid feelings of helplessness and despair. Keep in mind that when it comes to food, however, the body needs variety to gather all the nutrients it needs for optimum health, so make sure you have variety in your routine too.

Morning

  • Wake up early. If you are lucky enough to have retired by this age and have no real “need” to get out of bed in the morning, you do now: getting your health back on track!

  • Getting Into a Routine to Beat Depression2

    Eat breakfast.A protein-rich meal first thing in the morning is the best way to guarantee lasting energy throughout the day. Eggs and yogurt are both great ways to consume protein. Plus, you'll need it because you are going to start exercising.

  • Exercise. Exercising in the morning means it's already out of your way so you can't put it off later in the day.

Noon

Getting Into a Routine to Beat Depression3

Sunlight stimulates the production of serotonin that will lift your mood.If you are at work, get out of the office for your lunch break. If you are lucky enough to live in a sunny climate, take advantage of those rays. Sunlight not only helps your body to absorb vitamin D for better bone health, it also helps stimulate the production of serotonin that will lift your mood. Never leave the house without wearing sunscreen.

Prepare your own lunch. This way you can control what goes into it. Eating food with a small number of ingredients helps ensure that you aren't ingesting any useless and unhealthy additives. Try a bean salad with a piece of whole-grain baguette and butter. Having a small piece of dark chocolate that contains antioxidants may also help boost your mood and control any sugar cravings.

Night

If you have a partner, work out a schedule so you aren't cooking dinner every night. One healthy meal option may include:

Getting Into a Routine to Beat Depression4
  • Eat a healthy meal at night to beat depression
  • Salmon for omega 3 fatty-acids
  • Spinach for calcium
  • Tomatoes for vitamin
  • Got to bed early to ensure you get an adequate amount of sleep.

More Information

If you have tried practicing a healthy lifestyle, but still suffer from depression during menopause, talk with your doctor. It may be time to consider alternative treatments. Click here to learn more about treatments for depression during menopause.

Is Counseling the Solution for Depression?

Talking to a counselor has been known to help lessen depressive symptoms. Staying active can also help improve mood and release serotonin and endorphins in

Depression during Postmenopause FAQs

Getting your life back on track after menopause can be hard to do when you're battling depression.

Depression after Menopause

Depression can continue from perimenopause into postmenopause or appear for the first time in postmenopause. Women are at a higher risk.

Sources:
  • University Health Services.(n.d)."Clinical Depression".Retrieved from www.uhs.berkeley.edu
  • University of Michigan Depression Center.(n.d)."Women and Depression: Menopause".Retrieved from www.med.umich.edu.