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Dairy Food, Calcium, and Risk of Cancer in the Menopausal Woman the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

Review on January 07, 2010

Dairy food and calcium intakes are believed to have different effects on individual cancer sites on participants, which included the menopausal woman who has undergone hormone therapy, but so far evidence has been confusing. Also, overall impact on cancer in uncertain. The study detailed below indicates that calcium intake is linked to a reduced risk of total cancer and cancers of the digestive system, especially colorectal cancer in the menopausal woman. Taking into consideration in this study were factors such as age of the menopausal woman, hormone therapy used by the menopausal woman, and duration of hormone therapy use by the menopausal woman.

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Due to a lack of data regarding the relationship between dairy food, calcium intakes and cancers at individual sites in the menopausal woman who has used hormone therapy, particularly cancers with a relatively low occurrence, it has been hard to evaluate the overall effect of dairy food and calcium intakes on total cancer. Thus, this study included an analysis of the menopausal woman who had undergone hormone therapy and it looked at whether dairy food and calcium intake were linked to risk of total cancer as well as cancer at numerous individual sites in the body of the menopausal woman who had undergone hormone therapy.

It has been proposed that dairy food can protect against the growth of colorectal and breast cancer in the menopausal woman who has received hormone therapy. Calcium has been shown to reduce spread, to stimulate differentiation, and to cause apoptosis in cells in the gastrointestinal tract and breast. This study discovered that dairy food and calcium intake were considerably inversely related to colorectal cancer risk in participants including the menopausal woman who had undergone hormone therapy.

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This review is among the first sizeable prospective group examinations looking at dairy food and calcium intakes linked to cancer in the head and neck, esophagus, or stomach. It established that supplemental and total calcium intakes showed suggestive inverse associations in the menopausal woman who had undergone hormone therapy. In the menopausal woman who experienced hormone therapy, the associations for supplemental and total calcium intakes were not statistically significant, but the incidences of these cancers were small. Generally, these findings indicate that calcium intake plays a part in thwarting cancers of the digestive system.

In the menopausal woman who had undergone hormone therapy, supplemental calcium intake was inversely linked to liver cancer, but it was positively related to NHL. In view of the fact that the relationship with liver cancer was observed only in the menopausal woman who had undergone hormone therapy, and that the number of liver cancer cases was small, this data is most likely due to chance. More exploration of dairy food and calcium intakes in and their link to cancers in liver and NHL is necessary.

This study mainly focused on the menopausal woman and it found that dairy food and calcium intakes were not linked to breast cancer. These findings suggest that calcium intake, in keeping with current recommendations, is linked to reduced risk of total cancer in the menopausal woman and cancers of the digestive system, especially colorectal cancer. Moreover, the associations with dairy food and calcium intakes differed among individual cancer sites in the menopausal woman.