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4 Best Products for Weak Nails

Many women suffer through the constant rips, tears, and painful breaks that come along with having weak nails. Although women of any age can be affected by weak nails, it is an especially common condition for women who are going through menopause or women who are already past it. Hormone changes and imbalances - which are common during and after menopause - seem to affect calcium levels, which can lead to weaker nails and more breakages. Luckily, there are a few products that can help boost nail strength to keep them growing healthily.

4 Best Products for Weak Nails
1

Glass Nail Files

One way to keep nails growing strong is to file them regularly, usually once a week. Filing nails is like trimming hair - it helps to remove the old edges that might be prone to breaking. But most people use emery boards, which are made of material that can be rough on the nails, and this may leave already weakened nails even more likely to rip or tear. Nail files made of materials like glass or even crystal help to keep nails smooth and to eliminate the risk of nails catching and breaking.

2

Moisturizers

Sometimes, nails can get weak and break because they have become extra dry and brittle. If this is the case, moisturizing the nail and the cuticles can help to improve the flexibility and elasticity of the nail, which means the nail can withstand more pressure before breaking. While some stores will sell special creams and lotions meant specifically for cuticles and nails, any hand or body moisturizer can be used on the nails as well.

3

Nail Strengthening Formulas

To work on building up nail strength, several companies sell products that can be applied directly to the nail that will provide it with important nutrients. These products usually work like base coats of nail polish. They can be painted on with a brush, and they provide a level of extra strength and a layer of protection while the nail is absorbing the nutrients from the formula. These products can usually be applied underneath other nail polish colors, as well, and will still provide their strengthening benefits.

4

Supplements

Some of the most important elements of healthy nails are the building blocks used to make the nails, which generally come from a healthy diet. However, for those prone to weak and brittle nails, it may be helpful to begin taking supplements that will provide the body with some extra vitamins and nutrients that are vital to strong nails. Vitamins A, E, C, and B, iron, silica, biotin, protein, and - importantly - calcium are all important in nail health, and can be found in supplements for weak nails or added to a diet in food form.

While weak nails can be painful and difficult to deal with, these are the best products for weak nails and they can help to improve nail strength and prevent nail breakages. To learn more about dealing with weak and brittle nails, check out these brittle nail treatments.

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Sources:
  • Ohgitani, S. et al. (2008). Nail calcium content in relation to age and bone mineral density. Clinical Calcium 18(7). Retrieved April 19, 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18591748
  • Szyszkowska, B. et al. (2014). The influence of selected ingredients of dietary supplements on skin condition. Advances in Dermatology and Allergology 31(3). Retrieved April 19, 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4112259/
  • Iorizzo, M. et al. (2004). Brittle Nails. Journal of Cosmetic Dermaotlogy 3(3). Retrieved April 19, 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17134428