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I Have Breast Tenderness: What Should I Do?

Breast tenderness is something that women deal with at many stages in their life. It can be felt during premenstrual syndrome, pregnancy, or menopause. Whether you've dealt with it for a long time or it's a newly emerging symptom in the midst of menopause, it can be a bother to deal with. Quick movements, putting on a shirt, and intimate contact can all be disrupted by the pain. Luckily, you don't have to live with it for a long time if you know the most effective solutions.

I have breast tenderness: what should i do?

Eliminate Triggers

There are things you can do to control the severity of your breast pain. For one, try lowering your salt intake. Fluid retention is a core factor behind breast pain, which is worsened by excessive salt intake. Also, many women report a decrease in breast tenderness after eliminating caffeine, so try to replace your coffee with a caffeine-free stimulant such as ginkgo.

Wear a Supportive Bra

An uncomfortable or poorly fitting bra can agitate your breasts and make minor pain seem major. Try to wear a soft, supportive bra without an underwire to minimize discomfort. In addition, make sure that you are wearing the right size. Many undergarment stores will do measurements for you, and often women realize that they have been wearing the wrong size for years.

Try Herbal Supplements

Chasteberry is regularly prescribed to treat breast pain in Europe. Studies have found the reduction of pain in women taking the herb to be statistically significant. By helping regulate hormones such as prolactin, which is the hormone responsible for milk production during pregnancy, women experience relief.

Pain can also be alleviated by evening primrose oil, a plant extract used for menopause discomfort since Native American times. It's also a good idea to check up on your vitamin E levels, since insufficient levels are known by professionals to increase the severity of breast discomfort.

Be Relaxed

From cramps to breast pain, anxiety has a way of making these symptoms much worse. Deep breathing and calming the mind has a very regulating effect on the body, which can help alleviate pain. Try 20 minutes of meditation a day by turning on ambient music, closing your eyes, and breathing through worry. You can deepen you relaxation by joining a yoga studio or following a home DVD. Yoga actually raises levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter known to induce tranquillity.

This condition can be tricky to deal with, but not impossible. If you stay relaxed, take the necessary supplements, and make sure you are wearing a good bra, tenderness should subside soon. Make sure you get checked immediately if you notice the pain accompanied by a new lump or discharge from the nipple.

For further information on how to manage breast tenderness during menopause, follow the link below.

How Can I Treat Breast Swelling?

Breast swelling is a condition normally linked to hormone fluctuations. However, there are things you can do to help.

Symptoms of Breast Tenderness

Women experience hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle and menopause, which can cause breast tenderness. Read on to learn more.

Breast Pain Linked to Menopause

Breast pain is a symptom suffered by many women going through menopause. In addition to pain, it often triggers unfounded health concerns. Learn more.

Sources:
  • Marchand, W.R. (2012). Mindfulness-based stress reduction, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and Zen meditation for depression, anxiety, pain, and psychological distress. Journal of psychiatric practice, 18(4), 233-252. doi: 10.1097/01.pra.0000416014.53215.86
  • National Institutes of Health. (2013). Breast pain: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.Retrieved May 8, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003152.htm
  • NYU Langone Medical Center. (2013). Chasteberry. Retrieved May 8, 2014, from http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=21649
  • Office of Dietary Supplements. (2013). Vitamin E. Retrieved May 8, 2014, from http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/
  • Streeter, C.C. et al. (2012). Effects of yoga on the autonomic nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and allostasis in epilepsy, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Medical hypotheses, 78(5), 571-579. doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2012.01.021
  • University of Maryland Medical Center. (2011). Evening primrose oil. Retrieved May 8, 2014, from https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/evening-primrose-oil