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How to Cope with Right Breast Pain

Right breast pain is common, especially among menopausal women. Some women might be unfortunate and experience the symptom as pain that is so extreme that any contact with the breast causes sharp pain. Others might experience it as just a lingering tenderness and swelling that is ongoing and bothersome.

Whether you have dealt with this condition your whole life - as a monthly premenstrual syndrome (PMS) - or you're finding that it is just beginning during menopause, there are many alternative remedies available for relief. It is always wise to stay informed when it comes to breast pain.

How to Cope with Right Breast Pain

Be Active

Breast pain is typically worse for women who are over their healthy weight range. Breast pain will also tend to be less intense among women who are more active. While the idea of running around when your breasts hurt might seem unappealing, with the help of a supportive bra, low-impact exercise, can be a positive solution. Try swimming, dancing, or the elliptical machine at the gym when you have a spare moment.

You can also try yoga to balance out and strengthen your body as this practice will also help relieve stress and tenderness.

The improved circulation that comes from an active lifestyle can often take some pressure away from the breast.

Supportive Bra

Having a properly fitted and supportive bra is essential for all women. This becomes especially true however, for those suffering from breast pain. Some bras can cause further irritation if they are too tight or have an underwire; while one the other hand, wearing no bra can also be uncomfortable because of the lack of support provided for your breasts. A soft sports bra or a well-padded bra can offer support and comfort to the affected area.

Warm-Cold Compress

A cold compress can be extremely effective for pain relief. If you have achiness or sharp pain, use a warm press for 15 - 20 minutes to find relief. On the other hand, if your breast is swollen and tender, an ice pack will help.

Chasteberry

This herb, a standard treatment for breast pain in Europe, works by slowing down the release of prolactin, a hormone that stimulates milk production in pregnant women. Women experiencing breast pain during menopause can also benefit from the herb as prolactins are also released during times of menstruation or other hormonal shifts like during menopause. This can cause pain since no milk is actually being produced.

Vitamin E

Studies have found that taking a daily dose of vitamin E can greatly reduce the severity of breast pain. Try taking a supplement or eating foods such as tofu, spinach, almonds, and sunflower seeds which are known to contain it in abundance. Tofu has the added bonus of also containing phytoestrogens, hormones which can balance your estrogen levels and reduce pain in the breast.

Recommendations

While breast pain can be difficult to deal with, it is not impossible. Relief can be found in the form of exercise, sufficient vitamin E intake or warm and cold compresses. Make sure that you get examined by a doctor immediately if you notice your pain is accompanied by a new lump or discharge from the nipple.

For further information on dealing with breast pain and menopause follow the link below.

Breast Swelling and Tenderness

Concerned about breast tenderness and swelling? Read this article about the causes and treatments of these annoying symptoms.

Breast Pain Linked to Menopause

Breast pain is a symptom suffered by many women going through menopause. In addition to pain, it often triggers unfounded health concerns. Learn more.

Breast Tenderness and Pregnancy

Breast tenderness can be an early warning sign of a host of conditions including pregnancy and menopause. Learn about the difference here.

Sources:
  • National Institutes of Health. (2012). Breast pain. Retrieved March 18, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003152.htm
  • National Institutes of Health. (2013). Soy. Retrieved March 18, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007204.htm
  • NYU Langone Medical Center. (2014). Chasteberry. Retrieved March 18, 2014, from http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=21649
  • Office of Dietary Supplements. (2013). Vitamin E. Retrieved March 18, 2014, from http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/