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5 Diet Changes to Fix Body Odor in Women

Though many find it an uncomfortable subject to discuss, female body odor is actually a common problem, and it becomes increasingly likely as women mature and experience menopause. Thankfully, there are numerous lifestyle changes that are easy to adopt and can clear up the issue naturally. Read on to learn about the connection between body odor and diet, and discover five dietary changes you can make to find relief.

Salmon, pumpkin seeds, and plenty of water can help women fix their body odor.
1

Eating More Seafood

Main courses matter, especially when talking about body odor and diet. Red meat is known to contribute to the problem, so it's recommended to substitute the steak for seafood as often as possible. Crab, oysters, and fish contain lots of zinc, an essential mineral to fight off unwanted smells. Salmon, for example, is easy to find in most grocery stores and supermarkets, and it can be prepared a seemingly infinite amount of ways to fit personal taste and get results.

2

Embracing Fall Favorites

Dropping temperatures signal the end of summer - but for those looking to balance body odor and diet needs, an autumn harvest is certainly worth cheering for. Squash and pumpkin seeds are packed with magnesium, which works with zinc to protect against this condition. Nuts like almonds, cashews, and peanuts also make a great magnesium-rich snack, while beans and lentils contribute the same to larger meals.

3

Saying No to Spice

Garlic, onion, curry, and more might make a dish more interesting, but they can also put body odor and diet uncomfortable contrast by making unpleasant smells worse, emanating from the inside out. Spices and herbs release their fragrance through sweat glands long after they have been eaten, so aromas linger on the skin. Additionally, hot foods can cause excess sweating, which only serves to aggravate the situation. By replacing these flavors with others like mint, lemon, or parsley, dinner will cease to be a trigger without losing its taste.

4

Drinking More Water

It's always a good idea to stay hydrated to benefit overall health. Water keeps all bodily processes working as they should, and it reduces the risk of hot flashes and other menopause symptoms that cause sweating. It also takes the place of other beverages that negatively affect body odor and diet, such as alcohol and coffee, which offer the opposite results. Experts recommend four 16-ounce glasses per day.

5

Adding Phytoestrogenic Foods

For most women who suffer this condition later in life, hormonal imbalance is to blame, as body odor can appear as a symptom of menopause. To naturally balance out dipping estrogen levels, foods that contain phytoestrogenic nutrients can help. Avocado, tomatoes, and soy products like tofu can all give a boost to this hormone, both for body odor prevention and overall menopause relief.

No one has to live with body odor issues forever - especially when just a few simple alterations to daily food choices could eliminate the problem in no time. Armed with these suggestions, talk to a medical professional today to make a plan for a healthier lifestyle and stop worrying if it's you ever again.

For further information on how to treat this menopause symptom, follow the link below.

Myths and Facts about the Causes of Body Odor

Body odor is not often talked about, and therefore its causes can be unclear. Get rid of the mystery surrounding this condition by reading on.

Sources:
  • Dugdale, D. (2011). Sweating: Medline Plus Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 10, 2013 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003218.htm
  • Evert, A. (2011). Magnesium in diet: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 10, 2013 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002423.htm
  • Havlicek J. & Lenochova P. (2006). The effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness. Chemical Senses and Flavour Journal Oct;31(8), 747-752.
  • MedlinePlus. (2011). Garlic. Retrieved September 10, 2013 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/300.html