Hot Flashes Articles

Spicy Foods and Hot Flashes

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Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause. However, it is important to remember that these can be triggered and exacerbated by what you eat. Choosing the right foods can help you avoid hot flashes. Read on to find out what the combination of eating spicy food and hot flashes does to your body.

The Effect of Spicy Foods during Menopause

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It is widely regarded as a rule to keep away from hot and/or spicy foods when going through menopause. But why? While spicy food is great for clearing your nose, boosting metabolism, and other things, it's not good for hormonal imbalance. It can exacerbate existing normal issues and worsen menopausal symptoms. Nerve endings stimulated by these foods cause dilated blood vessels,which can directly lead to hot flashes

As a general rule, try to reduce consumption of peppers, curries, and other spicy foods.

What Are Other Triggers to Look out for?

Spicy foods tend to be the most talked about trigger for hot flashes, but after putting your jalapenos and jambalaya away it is important not to forget about other triggers. Some of the other culprits include:

Refined sugar

White sugar can be a big problem because it increases blood sugar levels. Products made using syrup or refined sugar should be avoided. Natural syrups and sugars are better, but should still be used sparingly.

Caffeine

This stimulant has received bad press for many years, and it is justified. Coffee, chocolate, and tea are the three main culprits, and can lead to an increase in hot flashes. While difficult to eliminate from your diet, at least try to cut down consumption.

Different people have different triggers. Try and see what's causing your problems. Chances are that adjusting your diet will go a long way to helping you. Click on the following link for more about hot flashes treatments.

How to Stop Hot Flashes Symptoms

Sweating, redness, and anxiety are all part of hot flashes. Different steps can be taken in order to alleviate these hot flash symptoms.

Managing Thyroid Problems and Hot Flashes

Although hot flashes are most commonly associated with menopause, they can also be caused by some thyroid conditions. Click here to learn more.

Hot Flashes and Chills

Hot flashes and chills can have a greater impact on daily life. Keep reading to learn more.

Sources:
  • Sikon, Andrea and Holly Thacker M.D. "Treatment for Menopausal Hot Flashes". Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. July 2004: 71 (7).
  • "Hot flashes ... in January". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2004: 170 (1).
  • Miller, Heather and Rose Maria Li, M.D. "Measuring Hot Flashes: Summary of a National Institutes of Health Workshop". Conference report. Mayo Clinic. June 2004: 79.